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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
in england. you present yourself as a secular muslim. but one trying to understand the religion and your role in it. >> i mean i grew up in a family in which there was very little religion. my father wasn't religious at all. but he was really interested in the subject of, you know, the birth and growth of islam. he basically transmitted that interest to me. so when i studied history at cambridge, i did a special subject in that exactly. while i was studying it was where i came across the so-called incident of the satanic verses. >> brown: you say in the book you noted good story. >> 20 years later i find out how good a story it was. >> brown: you wrote when you finished the satanic verses you thought it was the least political of the novels you had written at the time. you were genuinely surprised at what had happened. >> i thought i was very respectful about islam. yes from a secular point of view but it talks about the birth of this religion and i thought it was pretty admiring of the person at the center of it, the prophet of islam. >> brown: what did you think you were doing? what did you
of the religion. the religion of the book is not called islam. it is very heavily fictionalized. >> have you ever regretted writing it? >> i have been asked this question once a week for 24 years. the answer will always be no. i think it is a good buck. -- good book. people are finally being able to read it as a novel. young people, they are just coming to it fresh. some people love it, some people do not like it. >> you did not have an ordinary life. you were in hiding. you had an alias. what was your state of mind? >> very up and down. the first couple of years were very difficult. going back and looking at my journals at that time, which i have not looked at since then, it is quite obvious the person writing the journal's is very often in a state of the depression. it got easier, i felt, once i was able to begin to organize some kind of political resistance and develop a campaign with the help of a couple of human rights organizations and france to try to put pressure on european and -- your pet -- european governments to put pressure on the iranians. >> in this book, the heroes seem to be yor
of their religion. -- observent of their religion. and it seemed to me they were being asked to speak to a swing voter group which is very important to them. which is women. young women. of childbearing age. who are paying very close attention. >> we're going to see that answer replayed. or we may not see it. but through direct mail, through targeted online advertising, to women and other things, the obama campaign, that they have a new opportunity here with congressman ryan's sort of suggestion that i think he said something like we changed these laws through democratic processes or something. so meaning that there could be some type of a law. a change coming up here. so in the whole suggestion of the supreme court, which really hasn't been a big topic of discussion. all these conversations are going on in sub groups. so that is what's going on right now. is sort of this microcampaign. they know exactly, specific areas of interest for each voter and that's why they've been microtargeting things and things going on which we can't even see. gwen: and talking a lot about the future of the supreme
the talibaned the name of religion. we have seen a reasonable amount of change this time around. because malala is a young girl, because she is a teenager and a symbol against the battle of the taliban, political leaders have come out, they have spoken out against this with unequivocal condemnation this time. remember that the terrorists and these right-wing groups are a very small majority of the 180 million people living here in pakistan. >> woodruff: we also know that today pakistan's top military official, the chief of army staff general khani, went to visit her in the hospital. how significant is that? >> reporter: that's significant on a number of level, because, of course, the military has not been able to leave the swat valley. they still have a considerable presence, alongside the civilian administration, and the police there, to keep it protected to ensure that the taliban do not return to that area. and, of course, malala's in the civil military hospital where she's being cared for and operated on last night. general cahani's statement in particular is of interest, because of what i
be indonesia, too, the largest muslim population. is that more of a question of religion or geography or when you talk about geography you're talking about religion? >> it's about technology creating new geographical communities where you can have a pan islam. my previous book was about the indian ocean. >> rose: "monsoon" as i remember. >> right and the islam in southeast asia is very different --. >> rose: you talk to them and that's what they tell you. >> but because of technology muslims from one part of the greater middle east to the other part and to the muslim community in southeast asia can now interact with each other and rediscover their faith as a unit rather than a sepate groups. so it creates a new geography of islam. it's still about space so each place interacts with every other so in order to understand it you have to understand the connections and disaggregate it and understand that people become engaged about who owns the mountains in kashmir. best example is india and china. india and china, two gate civilizations, developed completely separated divided by the high wall of
to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. these talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how your religion played a part in that. and please there is such an emotional issue for so many people in this country, please talk personally about this if you could. congressman ryan. >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. my faith informs me about how to take care of the vulnerable, of how to make sure that people have a chance in life. now you why to ask basically why i'm pro-life. it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course. but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about ten and a half years ago my wife and i went to mercy hospital in janesville where i was born for ourselve enweek ultrasound for our first born child. and we saw that heartbeat, our little baby was in the shape of a bean. and to this day, we have nick named our first born child lizza bean. now i believe that life begins
values in regard to the family, to religion. >> abortion. >> abortion. issues on that. >> gay marriage. they're very conservative. that's basically what changed everything. i remember reading an article where president bush was asked what was one of his biggest regrets. he said, not passing immigration reform. as a republican and having a republican congress he could not convince his own party to support immigration reform. we focus only on the undocumented immigrants. i think that that's -- that that's what's happening, that when people perceive latinos, first thing that pops into their mind is immigrants and undocumented immigrants or like they say illegal aliens which is a term we don't like to use. they don't realize that 74% are americans, are citizens either by birth or naturalized. so the majority of latinos are americans and we have a buying power of over a trillion dollars. if latinos in the u.s. were a country, we would be the 14th largest economy in the world. they're 2.5 billion businesses that are latino owned. we are a very important part of this country. we contribute ve
americans consider themselves to be protestant. that's according to a new pew study on religion in the u.s. protestants historically made up a majority of the country. now, they account for 48% of the population. and one-fifth of adults in the survey had no religious affiliation. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: a new congressional report takes aim at two chinese telecommunications giants. jeffrey brown reports. these are the second and fifth largest makers of wireless telecommunication gear in the world. they're looking to expand their limited sales in the u.s. but in a 52-page report, the house intelligence committee warned monday against doing business with the chinese companies, citing concerns over corporate speen, cyber war risks and more. committee chair mike rogers. >> the investigation concluded that the risks associated with these companies providing equipment and services to u.s. critical infrastructure undermines the core u.s. national security interests. as a majority of u.s. networks are run by private companies, we recommend that priv
for ivory isn't limited to one religion. in asia, groups of christians, buddhists and muslims all covet it. "national geographic's" two-year investigation revealed that governments are often complicit in the purchasing and processing of ivory. the magazine also found that ivory traffickers are operating with impunity, thwarting poorly written international laws and ineffective organizations designed to clamp down on the illegal trade. in countries where corruption is widespread, ivory that is seized by the authorities, often disappears. in 2006 a government storeroom in thailand, like this one in bangkok, was raided, and the tusks replaced with plastic replicas. meanwhile, in 2011 more elephants were poached than in any year since a global ban on ivory trading was passed in 1989. they were killed for their tusks and tusks alone. the reporter on the story, brian christie, joins us now, thanks for being with us. pleasure being here, hari. >> sreenivasan: didn't the planet say ivory trade was illegal back in 1990? >> it did. it did. and as soon as it did elephant populations began to recover.
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)